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International Review of Social Research

Print ISSN: 2069-8267
Online ISSN: 2069-8534
Frequency: Three times a year
Current volume: 4/2014

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International Review of Social Research, a scholarly peer-reviewed journal, welcomes articles of all areas of sociology and social anthropology. All topics, methodological strategies and geographical locations are considered valuable, as long as articles are both theoretically and empirically grounded. Comparative, ethnographic, critical and space-sensitive approaches are welcomed.

The journal publishes only original (unpublished anywhere else) work, grounded in all areas of sociology, social/cultural anthropology and cognate disciplines such as cultural studies, social policy and industrial relations. We also encourage the submission of research articles that cover emergent, borderland and unexplored topics in both sociology and anthropology.

International Review of Social Research is a Walter DeGruyter Open journal and currently available at http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/irsr

 

News and Annoucements

Call for papers: ‘Alternative spaces and inovative methodologies’, special issue of International Review of Social Research, Volume 6, issue 1, May 2016

Guest editors: Duncan Light (University of Bournemouth), Craig Young (University of Manchester Metropolitan), Laura Grűnberg (University of Bucharest).

The International Review of Social Research (www.irsr.eu) seeks for articles for a special issue on food and culture to be published in May 2016.

The alternative space is not a location, a passive space in which we live but it is lived and embodied, constructed and deconstructed through various social interactions and significations attributed by different social actors in different historical, geographical, political, economic, cultural contexts. Lefebvre (1991) defines the space as a social product shaped by our interactions and the social environments. It becomes a space of social practices that involves the cognitive, sensorial and emotional involvement of the social actors. The third space, mental space, perceived space interacts continuous with each and every one of us, mediating the processes of movement in time and space and the relationships with the environment.

The aim of this special issues is to bring and focus the discussion on the concept of alternative space: (i) at the crossroads of various disciplines (e.g. sociology, mental geography, geocriticism, environment psychology, imaginative geography, art, anthropology, urbanism, literature, etc.); (ii) within the context of a full range of methodological perspectives (quantitative and qualitative) and levels of analysis (micro- messo and macro).

Some possible topics of the papers may be related to (but are not restricted at): • The alternative space as an area of the interdisciplinary field of study; • Methodological innovation in the study of the alternative space; • Art and space; • Space and every day life; • Urban regeneration; • The gendered space; • Space and intersectionality; • Non spaces/Meta-spaces; • Smart Spaces.

The authors are invited to send papers in English (4,000 – 8,000 words including references) together with an abstract of no more than 150 words to the following address: to Adina Manta (adina.manta@ymail.com) with copy to irsr@sas.unibuc.ro until March 1th, 2016. Prior to submission, please check author guidelines at http://irsr.eu/instructions.html.

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Call for papers: ‘Food and culture. Cultural patterns and practices related to food in everyday life’, special issue of International Review of Social Research, Volume 5, Issue 1, May 2016.

Guest editors: Jean-Jacques Boutaud (Université de Bourgogne), Anda Becuţ (National Institute for Research and Cultural Training), Angelica Marinescu (University of Bucharest).

The International Review of Social Research (www.irsr.eu) seeks for articles for a special issue on food and culture to be published in May 2016.

As an everyday activity, sustaining our life, eating experiences reveal complex relationship between food and society, involving material and symbolic aspects of cultures, dietary order, but also aesthetics or hedonism (Lévi-Strauss, 1966, Douglas, 1971, Fischler, 1980, Beardsworth & Keil, 1997). Bringing on stage cultural values, food becomes a central identity marker, defining personality, social class, lifestyles, gender roles and relationships, from family, to community, to ethnic groups or nationality, changing through time and place. Food is a lens to analyze society order, historical changes, power and politics, if we think of the pioneering works in this area of studies, from Pierre Bourdieu’s analysis of the social classes’ taste (1979), Jack Goody’s connection between cuisine and class in West Africa (1982), Sidney Mintz research on sugar, modern times and colonialism (1985), to Arjun Appadurai’s work on nationalism and cuisines (1988).

The more recent trend towards food heritage and heritagisation reveals the dynamic role of history in understanding culture, as well as the marketization of culinary traditions. Social changes, like evolutions in intergroup relations within societies, migration phenomena such as nomadism, refugees, expatriates, tourism, alongside with the industrialization of food production or the globalization of foods, the role of mass media and new technologies, all have their impact on the food production, distribution, preparation, foodways or drinkways changing either by expressing individual or group preferences for alternative consumption manners, or at collective level.

This special issue of the International Review of Social Research addresses the scholars from these disciplines in particular, with no discrimination between different schools and approaches. We intend to open the debate for interdisciplinary exchanges of ideas and to facilitate crossroads between different disciplines such as anthropology, ethnology, sociology, history etc.

The journal will also welcome work from the full range of methodological positions possible today: both quantitative and qualitative, and micro- and macro-level research. Specific methods such as interviews, surveys, questionnaires, ethnographies, documentary sources, textual analyses, participant and non-participant observation will be welcome.

We are interested in an extended spectrum of research themes, mostly including: food, identity and social change, food heritage and culinary practices, marketing and food markets, quality of food and health issues, the politics of food production and consumption, food security: issues of quantity and quality, food safety regulations and standards, etc.

Some possible topics of the articles can be related to food and group identity: food as manifestation of cultural origins and influences food as transmigration, diaspora and de-colonialism, food and ritual, the histories of food; repasts of the past, food at the interface with class and culture, and so on.

The editors kindly request authors to send papers (4,000 – 8,000 words in length) together with an abstract of no more than 200 words, to the following address: anda.becut@culturadata.ro until February 29th, 2016. Prior to submission, please check author guidelines at http://irsr.eu/instructions.html.

Highlights

Identity and the New Nationalist Pronouncements| JEAN-CLAUDE KAUFMANN

Should you accept a friends request from your mother? And other Filipino dilemmas | Daniel MILLER, Mirca MADIANOU

Mosaics of Inclusion: Reflections on Thames Chase Community Forest | RUTH PINDER

The Response of the Hermeneutic Social Sciences to a 'Post Carbon World' | Michael REDCLIFT

Cosmopolitans, Spatial Mobility and the Alternative Geographies| Magdalena NOWICKA

Introduction: Limitations to Temporary Mobility | Raluca NAGY, Mari KORPELA

Aims and Scope

International Review of Social Research publishes original research articles, but also, occasionally, special issues, debates and commentaries that focus on the study of human society, social structures, social change, human behavior as it is shaped by social forces, as well as on any aspects of the scientific study of human beings and culture.


International Review of Social Research welcomes articles from all areas of sociology and social/cultural anthropology.  No research topic, methodological strategy or geographical location is considered irrelevant, as long as articles are both theoretically and empirically grounded. Comparative, ethnographic, critical and space-sensitive approaches are welcomed.

Editorial Contacts

Editor in chief: Marian-Gabriel Hâncean, University of Bucharest
Managing editor: Ioana Boja, University of Bucharest

Editorial Board:
Judith Bodnar, Central European University
Michael Burawoy, University of California, Berkeley
Sharad Chari, London School of Economics and Political Science
Elizabeth Dunn, University of Colorado at Boulder
Krisztina Fehérváry, University of Michigan
Herbert J. Gans, Columbia University
Gail Kligman, University of California Los Angeles
Jessaca Leinaweaver, Brown University
Duncan Light, Liverpool Hope University
Nicolette Makovicky, University of Oxford
Alex Preda, University of Edinburgh
Doug Rogers, Yale University
Ivan Szelenyi, New York University, Abu-Dhabi
Katherine Verdery, Graduate Center, City University of New York
Andrew Walder, Stanford University
Craig Young, Manchester Metropolitan University

Editorial staff: Bogdan Pălici, Laura-Adnana Onișoară, Iulian Oană

Author Guidelines

The journal publishes only original (unpublished anywhere else) work, grounded in all areas of sociology, social/cultural anthropology and cognate disciplines such as cultural studies, social policy and industrial relations. We also encourage the submission of research articles that cover emergent, borderland and unexplored topics in both sociology and anthropology.

Language

International Review of Social Research publishes articles in English. In order to assure the quality of their English-language submissions, authors for whom English is a second language are encouraged to have their manuscript professionally edited. A list of editing services providers can be found at http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/english_language.asp. (All services are paid for and arranged by the author. Their usage does not facilitate acceptance).

Articles
Article Length 
Articles should have 4,000 to 8,000 words, including references. Articles longer than that will be rejected.

Titles and subtitles
Both titles and subtitles should be short. Throughout the manuscript, subtitles are not to be numbered.

Abstracts
The research questions, key argument, methodology and main findings should be outlined in an abstract of 100-150 words. The abstract paragraph should be different than the opening paragraph of the article. You may find some useful advice on abstract construction here [http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/seo.asp].

Keywords
Four to six keywords should follow the abstract paragraph.

Title, authors, institutional affiliation and acknowledgements page
Each manuscript should have a separate page containing: (1) the title of the article, (2) author(s), (3) institutional affiliation of the authors, (4) e-mail address(es) and (4) acknowledgements (if relevant). Important: When more than one author, please indicate in a footnote on the title page the corresponding author.

Style
Lengthy literature reviews should be avoided. Authors should engage only authors and references relevant for their topic. Please avoid excessive jargon and use readable style. If acronyms are used, they should be defined when they first appear in the text. Please use plurals instead of he/she. For emphasis, use italics, but please keep them at a minimum. Please do not use bold or underline. Use italics for title of books, newspapers, novels when they appear in the main text. Spell out numerals under 10. Use “per cent” in the text; “%” sign should be used in the tables.

Citation
References should follow this model: (Author(s), year: page number). Quotes longer than 40 words should be indented without the use of inverted commas. For quotations within the text please make sure to use single inverted commas on all occasions, except for a quotation within a quotation which should be placed within double inverted commas.

Endnotes
Should be kept at a minimum and should be placed before the references.

References

Only works cited in the text should be listed in the bibliography.

Book, single author

Crenson, M. A. (1983) Neighborhood Politics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Book, multiple authors

Lakoff, G. and M. Johnson (1980) Metaphors We Live By. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Edited Volume

McKinnon, S. and S. Silverman (2005) (eds.) Complexities: Beyond Nature and Nurture. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Article in book

Caplan, J. (2001) ‘This or That Particular Person: Protocols of Identification in Nineteenth-Century Europe’ In Caplan, J. and J. Torpley (eds.) Documenting Individual Identity: The Development of State Practices in the Modern World, pp. 49-66. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Journal article, single author

Cameron Hay, M. (2010) ‘Suffering in a productive world: Chronic illness, visibility, and the space beyond agency’. American Ethnologist, 37(2):259-274.

Journal article, multiple authors

Lim, C. and R. Putnam (2010) ‘Religions, Social Networks and Life Satisfaction’. American Sociological Review, 75(6):914-933.

Manuscript

Johnson, K. (2011) Multiplicity and Scale. MS.

Website

Johnson, K. (2011) ‘Title of Article’, URL. (consulted day, month, year).

Tables and charts
All tables should have titles placed above and the source(s) places beneath it. They should be numbered consecutively. Tables and charts should be placed at the end of the article, after the references section, with an indication in the text as to their placement.

Illustrations
Any diagram or photograph should be named “Figure” in the manuscript. Black and white photographs are accepted, as long as their resolution is high (more than 300 dpi). Images should be sent or uploaded separately from the main text, with an indication in the text as to their placement.

Proofs and offprints
Before publication, the corresponding author will receive proofs. They need to be returned to the editors within 15 days since received. After publication, the authors will receive a printed copy of the journal.

Commentaries
Occasionally, the editor in chief will commission commentaries for selected articles. Unsolicited comments will not be published.

Debates
Occasionally, the International Review of Social Research will publish debates about emerging theoretical and methodological issues, in order to provoke critical reflection. Normally, these are commissioned, but they may also be suggested to the editor in chief. They should have between 3000 and 5000 words and should focus on a number of two to six books that discuss similar topics. The style set out above for articles should be followed; “Debates” essays will also be peer reviewed.

International Review of Social Research does not publish book reviews.

Special issues
International Review of Social Research welcomes the creation of special issues. Guest editors should send a call for papers containing: (1) the proposed title for the special issue; (2) an indication of who the guest editors are and a short description of their area of expertise; (3) a Call for Papers statement to be posted on the International Review of Social Research website. The Call for Papers should have up to 500 words. In addition to that, the guest editors may also choose to submit clusters of four to six articles to the editor in chief. Articles grouped in special issues go through the normal double blind peer reviewed evaluation procedure and should respect the style and format outlined above.

Peer Review Process
International Review of Social Research is committed to double blind peer reviewed system. Both the author(s) and the referees’ identities are obscured during the evaluation procedure. After the initial editor screening, the manuscript is sent for evaluation to two to four referees. The editors are committed to an efficient system of evaluation. A decision on the acceptability of the manuscript will be communicated within two months of submission.

Author(s) may suggest the name, affiliation and e-mail of up to two scholars whose specialization allows them to evaluate the manuscript. These should exclude colleagues in one’s department and doctoral dissertation supervisors. Author(s) may also indicate the name of up to two scholars who should not act as referees for that manuscript. 

The author(s) should remove any elements, especially self-citation, from the body of the manuscript, footnotes or references which might help the referee to identify the author.

Submit an article
Articles, debates and special issue proposals may submitted either directly to irsrjournal@gmail.com OR up-loaded directly on this website (please fill in all boxes). Please read carefully the Author Guidelines before submitting an article.

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